Step-by-Step: Building a Model in Revit

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Step 1. Begin a new project.

1.1. In the Revit startup screen, under Projects, click on Architectural Template.

Step 2. Set up a Basement Level.

2.1. In the Project Browser, under Elevations (Building Elevation), double-click South.

2.2. Add a Level for the Basement, at an elevation of -10′-0″ (negative ten feet, zero inches).

2.2.1. On the Architecture tab, Datum panel, click on the Level tool. (Keyboard shortcut: LL.)

2.2.2. Position the Level tool at the left end of the already-existing Level 1 line. Don’t click yet; just move the tool downward until the dimension reads 10′-0″ (ten feet, zero inches).

2.2.3. Click to begin the Level.

2.2.4. Move the Level tool to the right until it aligns with the right endpoint of the already-existing Level 1 line.

2.2.5. Click to end the Level. (It will automatically be named Level 3.)

2.2.6. Click [esc] twice.

2.2.7. Double-click on the Level name (“Level 3”).

2.2.8. Type Basement in the text box and press [enter]. When prompted about renaming corresponding views, reply “Yes.”

2.2.9. Click [esc] twice.

Step 3. Modify the existing Level 2.

3.1. Change the elevation of Level 2 to 9′-6″.

3.1.1. Zoom in on the right end of the Level 2 line.

3.1.2. Double-click on the elevation text (10′-0″).

3.1.3. Type 9′-6″ in the text box and press [enter].

3.1.4. Click [esc] twice.

Step 4. Add Levels for the Clerestory and Roof.

4.1. Add a Level for the Clerestory at an elevation of 23′-3″ (twenty-three feet, three inches).

4.1.1. On the Modify tab, Modify panel, click the Copy tool. (By default, the Copy tool has a white circle and two blue circles. Keyboard shortcut: CO.)

4.1.2. Click anywhere on the existing Level 2.

4.1.3. Click [enter].

4.1.4. Click anywhere in the Drawing Area.

4.1.5. Move the mouse vertically, in the upward direction, and type 13′-9″ (thirteen feet, nine inches).

4.1.6. Click [esc] twice.

4.1.7. Rename the newly created Level to Clerestory by double-clicking on the Level name. When prompted about renaming corresponding views, reply “Yes.”

4.2. Using the same process as you used to add the Clerestory Level, add a Level for the Roof at an elevation of 31′-0″ (thirty-one feet, zero inches). (Tip: The Roof Level is 7′-9″ above the Clerestory Level.)

4.2.1. Rename the newly created Level to Roof by double-clicking on the Level name. When prompted about renaming corresponding views, reply “Yes.”

revit-tutorial_01-levels

Step 5. Add walls on Level 2.

5.1. In the Project Browser, double-click on Floor Plans – Level 2.

5.2. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Wall tool. (Tip: Either click directly on the Wall tool icon, or choose Wall: Architectural from the dropdown.)

5.3. In the Options Bar, change the wall height from Unconnected to Roof. (Alternatively, in the Properties Palette, set the Top Constraint to “Up to level: Roof”.)

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5.4. In the Properties Palette, set the Type Selector to Basic Wall Generic – 8″.

5.5. In the Modify | Place Wall tab, click the Rectangle tool.

5.6. Use the Rectangle tool to construct a rectangular enclosure measuring 26′-2″ x 80′-0″, dimensioned to the Exterior Finish Face of the walls.

5.6.1. The Rectangle tool can be used to quickly sketch a rectnagular enclosure of approximately correct size; click on two corner points to draw. After the enclosure is sketched, use the temporary dimensions to adjust its size precisely. (Tip: After drawing the rectangle, click on the blue-filled circle at each of the dimension “witness lines” to change the measuring location for a dimension, then click on the dimension text to change the dimension.)

5.7. Click [esc] twice.

Step 6. Construct a Floor on Level 2.

6.1. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Floor tool. (Tip: Either click directly on the Floor tool icon, or choose Floor: Architectural from the dropdown.)

6.2. Use the Floor tool to construct a Floor aligning with the Level 2 walls.

6.2.1. On the Modify | Create Floor Boundary tab, Draw panel, click the Pick Walls tool (it is selected by default).

6.2.2. Use the Pick Walls tool to click in turn on all four walls.

6.2.3. On the Modify | Create Floor Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the floor boundary.

6.3. Click [esc] twice.

6.4. Optional: At any point in the process, you can view your work in 3D by clicking on the Default 3D View tool in the Quick Access Toolbar.

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Step 7. Construct Level 1 walls.

7.1. In the Project Browser, double-click on the Level 1 floor plan.

7.2. In the Properties Palette, set Level 2 as underlay.

7.2.1. Click [esc] twice to make sure that nothing is selected. Then, in the Properties Palette, scroll down to the Underlay heading. Set the Range: Base Level to Level 2 and click Apply.

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7.3. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Wall tool. (Tip: Either click directly on the Wall tool icon, or choose Wall: Architectural from the dropdown.)

7.4. In the Options Bar, set the wall height to Level 2. (Alternatively, in the Properties Palette, set the Top Constraint to “Up to level: Level 2”.)

7.5. In the Modify | Place Wall tab, click the Line tool.

7.6. Use the Line tool to sketch four walls in the north-south direction corresponding to the diagram in the project handout. (Tip: To sketch a wall with the Line tool, hover the mouse over the existing Level 2 wall and click on a Nearest point; then move the mouse downward to the opposite wall and click on a Vertical and Nearest point. Click [esc] and repeat with the next wall. Click [esc] twice to drop the Wall tool.)

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7.7. Use Temporary Dimensions to precisely set the walls in their desired locations.

7.7.1. Because the project sketch does not indicate dimensions to position the Level 1 walls, you can determine these dimensions on your own. The dimensions in the following steps are shown as an example.

7.7.2. Click [esc] twice to make sure nothing is selected.

7.7.3. Click in succession on two adjacent Level 1 walls to highlight the Temporary Dimensions between them.

7.7.4. Click on the blue-filled circle at each of the dimension “witness lines” to change the measuring location for a dimension. Next, click on the dimension text to change the dimension.

7.7.5. Optional: Click on the Permanent Dimension icon (it is directly beneath the Temporary Dimension text) to display the dimension permanently. Next, click on the permanent dimension, and click on the padlock icon to lock the dimensional relationship.

7.7.6. Optional: Use the Aligned Dimension tool on the Quick Access Toolbar (Keyboard shortcut: DI) to add dimensions anywhere in the project.

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Step 8. Construct Level 1 floor.

8.1. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Floor tool. (Tip: Either click directly on the Floor tool icon, or choose Floor: Architectural from the dropdown.)

8.2. Use the Floor tool to construct two separate floors corresponding to the wall locations.

8.2.1. On the Modify | Create Floor Boundary tab, Draw panel, click the Rectangle tool.

8.2.2. Use the Rectangle tool to draw rectangles corresponding to the two floor locations.

8.2.3. Optional: After drawing a rectangle, click the padlock icon to lock the edge of the floor to the wall.

8.2.4. On the Modify | Create Floor Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the floor boundary.

8.3. Click [esc] twice.

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Step 9. Construct basement walls and floor.

9.1. In the Project Browser, double-click on the Basement floor plan.

9.2. In the Properties Palette, set Level 2 as underlay.

9.2.1. Click [esc] twice to make sure that nothing is selected. Then, in the Properties Palette, scroll down to the Underlay heading. Set the Range: Base Level to Level 2 and click Apply.

9.3. Use the Wall tool to construct perimeter walls at the Basement level.

9.3.1. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Wall tool. (Tip: Either click directly on the Wall tool icon, or choose Wall: Architectural from the dropdown.)

9.3.2. In the Options Bar, set the wall height to Level 1. (Alternatively, in the Properties Palette, set the Top Constraint to “Up to level: Level 1″.)

9.3.3. In the Properties Palette, set the Type Selector to Basic Wall Generic – 12”.

9.3.4. In the Modify | Place Wall tab, click the Rectangle tool.

9.3.5. In the Options Bar, set the Location Line to Finish Face: Exterior.

9.3.6. Click on two opposite corners of the rectangle, corresponding with the Level 2 walls, to create the basement walls.

9.3.7. Click [esc] twice.

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9.4. Construct the basement floor.

9.4.1. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Floor tool. (Tip: Either click directly on the Floor tool icon, or choose Floor: Architectural from the dropdown.)

9.4.2. On the Properties Palette, use the Type Selector to choose the Generic – 12″ floor.

9.4.3. On the Modify | Create Floor Boundary tab, Draw panel, click the Pick Walls tool(it is selected by default).

9.4.4. Use the Pick Walls tool to click in turn on all four walls.

9.4.5. On the Modify | Create Floor Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the floor boundary.

Step 10. Construct the Roof.

10.1. In the Project Browser, double-click on the Roof floor plan.

10.2. In the Properties Palette, set Level 2 as underlay.

10.2.1. Make sure that nothing is selected. Then, in the Properties Palette, scroll down to the Underlay heading. Set the Range: Base Level to Level 2 and click Apply.

10.3. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Roof by Footprint tool.

10.4. Use the Roof by Footprint tool to construct a flat roof.

10.4.1. In the Options Bar, make sure to check “off” on the Defines Slope box before creating the roof.

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10.4.2. In the Modify | Create Roof Footprint tab, Draw panel, click the Pick Walls tool (it is selected by default).

10.4.3. Use the Pick Walls tool to click in turn on all four walls.

10.4.4. On the Modify | Create Roof Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the roof boundary.

10.5. Click [esc] twice.

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Step 11. Construct the South Elevation Clerestory Windows.

11.1. Double-click on the South Elevation view.

11.2. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Window tool.

11.3. In the Properties Palette, use the Type Selector to choose the Fixed 36″ x 48″ window.

11.4. Click Edit Type.

11.5. In the Type Properties dialog box, click the Duplicate button (upper right-hand corner of the dialog box).

11.6. In the Name dialog box, type Wide Window 1, and click OK.

11.7. In the Dimensions section of the Type Properties dialog box, change the Height to 6′-5″ (six feet, five inches); change the Width to 15′-6″ (fifteen feet, six inches); and change the Default Sill Height to 0′-0″ (zero feet, zero inches).

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11.8. In the South Elevation view, move the mouse to the clerestory and click to place a window.

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11.9. Click to place additional windows; press [esc] twice to drop the Window tool.

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11.10. Optional: Fine-tune the placement of the windows using dimension tools.

11.10.1. Double-click on the Clerestory Floor Plan.

11.10.2. Zoom in on the left end of the window on the left end of the wall.

11.10.3. In the View Control Bar (bottom of the screen), set the view scale to 3″ = 1′-0″. (This has the effect of increasing the fineness of lines in the view.)

11.10.4. Use the Move tool (keyboard shortcut: MV) to position the window to align precisely with the interior surface of the perendicular wall.

11.10.5. Type ZE to zoom to the extents of the project.

11.10.6. Zoom in on the right end of the window on the right end of the wall.

11.10.7. Use the Move tool (keyboard shortcut: MV) to position the window to align precisely with the interior surface of the perendicular wall.

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11.10.8. Type ZE to zoom to the extents of the project.

11.10.9. In the View Control Bar (bottom of the screen), set the view scale to 1/8″ = 1′-0″.

11.10.10. Use the Aligned Dimension tool (keyboard shortcut: DI) to place dimensions measuring between the midpoints of the windows.

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11.11.11. Click the EQ symbol. The dimensions are equalized.

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Step 12. Construct the East Elevation Clerestory Windows.

12.1. Double-click on the East Elevation view.

12.2. On the Architecture tab, Build panel, click the Window tool.

12.3. In the Properties Palette, use the Type Selector to choose the Wide Window 1 window.

12.4. Click Edit Type.

12.5. In the Type Properties dialog box, click the Duplicate button (upper right-hand corner of the dialog box).

12.6. In the Name dialog box, type Wide Window 2, and click OK.

12.7. In the Dimensions section of the Type Properties dialog box, change the Height to 6′-5″ (six feet, five inches); change the Width to 12′-3″ (twelve feet, three inches); and change the Default Sill Height to 0′-0″ (zero feet, zero inches).

12.8. In the East Elevation view, move the mouse to the clerestory and click to place a window.

12.9. Click to place additional windows; press [esc] twice to drop the Window tool.

12.10. Optional: Fine-tune the placement of the windows using dimension tools.

Step 13. Mirror the windows to opposite elevations.

13.1. Double-click on the Clerestory Floor Plan.

13.2. In the View Control Bar (bottom of the screen), set the view scale to 1/8″ = 1′-0″.

13.3. Type ZE to zoom to the project extents.

13.4. Select the windows on the south wall.

13.4.1. You can select the windows either by clicking on them one-at-a-time while pressing Ctrl. Or, you can draw a selection window around all of them at once, but then you will need to go to the Modify | Multi-Select tab, Selection panel, and click the Filter tool; check “off” on Walls.

13.5. With the windows selected, in the Modify | Windows tab, Modify panel, click the Mirror – Draw Axis tool (keyboard shortcut: DM).

13.6. Move the Mirror – Draw Axis tool to the midpoint of the west wall. When the midpoint is highlighted, click.

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13.7. Move the Mirror – Draw Axis tool to the right to indicate a horizontal mirroring line. Click to complete.

13.8. Repeat the mirroring process with the windows on the east wall.

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Step 14. Expand or redraw the existing Level 1 floor to receive the stair.

14.1.1. Double-click on the Level 1 Floor Plan.

14.1.2. Click on the existing Level 1 floor to select it.

14.1.3. On the Modify | Floors tab, Mode panel, click the Edit Boundary tool.

14.1.4. Use the Draw tools (Modify | Floors > Edit Boundary tab, Draw panel) to adjust the boundary of the floor. Alternatively, the existing floor boundary can be erased and redrawn.

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14.1.5. On the Modify | Edit Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the floor boundary. If prompted with “Would you like walls that go up to this floor’s level to attach to its bottom?” reply “No.”

Step 15. Construct the Stair from Level 1 to Level 2.

15.1. Double-click on the Level 1 floor plan.

15.2. Click [esc] twice to make sure nothing is selected.

15.3. On the Architecture tab, Circulation panel, choose the Stair by Sketch tool (from the Stair tool dropdown menu).

15.4. In the Properties Palette, check the parameters for the stair. The Base Level should be set to Level 1 and the Top Level to Level 2. Optional: Other stair-specific data can be changed using other parameters within the Properties Palette.

15.5. Click on a point within the stair hall (leftmost space on the first floor) to begin the stair.

15.6. As you move the mouse vertically within the stair hall, Revit will report the number of risers created and the number of risers remaining. (These numbers are determined by the stair parameters in the Properties Palette.)

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15.7. Continue to move the mouse vertically, past the point where the number of risers remaining is 0 (zero). Click to complete the stair.

15.8. On the Modify | Create Stairs Sketch tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the stair.

15.9. Click [esc] twice.

Step 16. Create a floor opening in Level 2 for the stair.

16.1. Double-click on the Level 2 floor plan.

16.2. On the View Control bar, change the Visual Style to Wireframe. (The Visual Style is set with the icon that looks like a solid cube.) This has the effect of making the floor transparent, so that the stair leading up to this level can be seen.

16.3. Select the existing Level 2 floor.

16.3.1. One way to select the existing floor is to draw a selection window around the entire building, then use the Selection Filter (Modify | Multi-Select tab, Selection panel) to check “off” on everything which is not a floor.

16.4. On the Modify | Floors tab, Mode panel, click the Edit Boundary tool.

16.5. Use the Draw tools (Modify | Floors > Edit Boundary tab, Draw panel) to create a rectangular floor opening at the stair.

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16.5.1. Optional: Use the padlock icons to lock the floor opening edges to the stair.

16.6. On the Modify | Edit Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark to complete the floor boundary. If prompted with “Would you like walls that go up to this floor’s level to attach to its bottom?” reply “No.”

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Step 17. Construct the Stair from the Basement to Level 1.

17.1. This process is similar to the process for constructing the stair from Level 1 to Level 2. Refer to that process for detail.

Step 18. Create a floor opening in Level 1 for the stair.

18.1. This process is similar to the process for creating a floor opening in Level 2. Refer to that process for detail.

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Step 19. Create a Toposurface around the building.

19.1. Double-click on the Site Floor Plan.

19.2. On the Massing & Site tab, Model Site panel, click the Toposurface tool.

19.3. On the Options Bar, set the Elevation to -6″ (negative six inches).

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19.4. In the drawing area, click on a succession of points to establish a rough rectangular boundary around the building.

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19.5. On the Modify | Edit Surface tab, Surface panel, click the green check mark to complete the toposurface.

Step 20. Create a Building Pad.

20.1. Double-click on the Site Floor Plan.

20.2. On the Massing & Site tab, Modify Site panel, click the Building Pad tool.

20.3. In the Properties Palette, set the Level to Basement.

20.4. On the Modify | Create Pad Boundary tab, Draw panel, click the Rectangle tool.

20.5. Use the Rectangle tool to trace the outline of the building. Optional: Use the padlock tools to lock the Building Pad edges to the building.

20.6. On the Modify | Create Pad Boundary tab, Mode panel, click the green check mark.

The model is complete.

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Rhino to AutoCAD Workflow: Cutting a Section

This workflow is designed to generate a line-drawn building section from a Rhino model for use in AutoCAD. It begins with a complete Rhino model and concludes with the AutoCAD drawing.

Step 1. Open the Rhino model:00.png

 

Step 2: Create a new layer. Give the layer a name like SECTION and a distinctive color. Make this new layer current.

Step 3: In the SECTION layer, draw a line as a guide for the section cut. This line represents the line along which the section will be cut:01.png

Step 4: Type SECTION [enter]. When prompted to Select objects for sections, type ALL [enter]:02.png

Step 5. When prompted to designate the Start of section, click on one endpoint of the guideline. When prompted to designate the End of section, move the mouse to the far side of the objects being cut. (Make sure ORTHO, F8, is turned on if you want to cut the section parallel with the relevant major axis.)03.png

Step 6. Because SECTION is a drawing command, it generates new geometry. As soon as the SECTION command is complete, the newly drawn geometry is automatically highlighted:04.png

Step 7. With the new geometry highlighted, choose File > Export Selected:05.png

Step 8. Save the exported geometry in the AutoCAD (.dwg) format:06.png

Step 9. Choose the 2004 Polylines option:07.png

Step 10. Start AutoCAD and open the drawing exported from Rhino:08.png

Step 11. If prompted with a warning dialog, choose Continue opening DWG file:09.png

Step 12. When the file is opened, it will appear in a “top down” view, so the section will appear like a single line:10.png

Step 13. Type 3DORBIT [enter] to orbit the model into a 3D view:11.png

Step 14. The geometry needs to be rotated to sit “flat” on the x-y plane. Type ROTATE3D:12.png

Step 15. When prompted to Select objects, type ALL [enter] to select all of the objects in the drawing:13.png

Step 16. In order to rotate the geometry in three-dimensional space, a rotational axis with two endpoints must be defined. Click on a point within the drawing to define the first endpoint of this axis:14.png

Step 17. With Ortho (F8) turned on, click on another point within the drawing to indicate the other endpoint of the rotational axis:15.png

Step 18. When prompted to Specify rotation angle, type either 90 [enter] or -90 [enter] depending on whether the geometry needs to rotate clockwise or counterclockwise around the axis. (To correct a mistaken rotation, the command can be undone or repeated with a rotation angle of 180.)16.png

Step 19. Type PLAN [enter]:18.png

Step 20. When prompted, click [enter] to accept the Current coordinate system (i. e., the World coordinate system):19.png

Step 21. It may be necessary to rotate the geometry again, but only in two-dimensional space. In the case shown here, the geometry needs to be rotated by 90 degrees. Type ROTATE [enter] and indicate the rotation angle:21.png

Step 22. The section drawing is ready. It may also be necessary to use the FLATTEN command to project all geometry to the x-y plane:

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Modeling from Mass Instances

This workflow is concerned with the creation of Revit geometry (building elements), such as floors and walls, based on imported masses. (For an example of importing a mass, see Importing a SketchUp Massing Model to Revit.)

1. Create or load a Mass family into a Revit project.

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2. View the mass in an Elevation view.

3. Create Levels corresponding to floor surfaces.

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4. Return to the default 3D view and select the mass by clicking on it.

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5. On the Modify|Mass tab, Model panel, click the Mass Floors tool.

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6. Select the Levels corresponding to the Mass Floors you wish to construct. Click OK.

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7. Verify the placement of the Mass Floors in the default 3D view. (Note: You may need to adjust the Visibility/Graphics settings to see the mass and the floors. Type VG and make sure the Mass category is fully visible.)

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8. On the Massing & Site tab, Model by Face panel, click the Floor tool.

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9. On the Modify|Place Floor by Face tab, Multiple Selection panel, click the Select Multiple tool.

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10. Click on a Mass Floor for which you wish to create a building floor. (Note: If the floor is to be offset from the level of its corresponding Mass Floor, set the Offset value on the Options Bar.)

11. In the Properties Palette, choose a Floor Type for the floor you wish to create.

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12. On the Modify|Place Floor by Face tab, Multiple Selection panel, click Create Floor.

13. Check the placement of floors in the default 3D view. (Note: You may need to adjust the Visibility/Graphics settings in order to hide the mass elements. Type VG and make sure the Mass category is hidden, i. e., unchecked.)

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Importing a SketchUp Massing Model to Revit

This workflow is intended for the situation in which you have created a massing model in SketchUp and wish to use the model as a guide for the construction of detailed Revit geometry. For the purposes of this tutorial, a massing model is understood to mean a model without interior volumes (corresponding to rooms) and without openings (corresponding to windows and doors).

1. Create a massing model in SketchUp.

2. Save the SketchUp model in .skp format. IMPORTANT: When saving from SketchUp, make sure to use SketchUp Version 8 to ensure compatibility with Revit.

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3. Start a new Revit project, or open an existing project in which you wish to place the massing model.

4. On the Massing & Site tab, Conceptual Mass panel, click the In-Place Mass tool.

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5. If the “Show Mass Enabled” dialog box appears, click Close. (This box appears to notify you that Revit has automatically enabled the display of mass elements.)

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6. Give the mass a name and click OK.

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7. On the Insert tab, Import panel, click the Import CAD tool.

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8. In the Import CAD Formats dialog box, navigate to your SketchUp file. Accept the default settings, and click Open.

9. Check the default 3D view of your imported massing model.

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10. Check the overall dimensions of the imported massing model to verify correct scaling. (If the model has imported at the incorrect size, it may be necessary to return to SketchUp to correct the model size and then repeat the importing procedure. Alternatively, it may be necessary to check the settings in Revit’s Import CAD Formats dialog box. Make sure that the Import units are at the default setting of “Auto-Detect.”)

11. On the Insert tab, In-Place Editor panel, click Finish Mass to complete the importing process.

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12. The massing model is now available in the Revit drawing window for further development.

Step-by-Step: Revit Tutorial / Adding Windows and Doors

To use this step-by-step tutorial, you will need to begin with an existing Revit model containing at least one wall.

WINDOWS

1. Choose a window type. On the Ribbon: Architecture > Build > Window. In the Properties palette, choose an appropriate window type (e. g., Fixed 36″ x 48″).

2. Navigate and place. In either a 3D view or a floor plan view of your model, navigate the mouse over the model and click to place a window. Window locations can be modified after placement by clicking on dimension strings and editing them. Windows can also be moved using the Move tool (Modify > Modify > Move, or type MV).

 

Notes:

To Create a Custom Window Size: On the Ribbon: Architecture > Build > Window. In the Properties palette, choose an appropriate window type (e. g., Fixed 36″ x 48″). In the Properties palette, click Edit Type. In the Type Properties dialog box, click Duplicate. Give the new window type a name (such as Custom — 72″ x 80″). Under Type Parameters, edit the Height and Width dimensions as required. Click OK to exit the Type Properties dialog box.

To Load Additional Window Families: On the Ribbon: Insert > Load from Library > Load Family. In the Load Family dialog box, navigate to the Windows directory and double-click on the family you wish to load. The next time you choose Window from the Architecture > Build panel, the newly loaded family will be available in the Type Selector.

 

DOORS

1. To Add Doors. Note that the process for inserting Doors is very similar to the process for Windows. Start with Architecture > Build > Door and selecting the desired door type in the Properties Palette. Doors can be placed in different views (e. g. floor plan views or 3D views).

Step-by-Step: Revit Tutorial / Adding Stairs

To use this step-by-step tutorial, you’ll need an existing Revit model containing at least two floor levels.

1. Insert Stairs. In the Project Browser, double-click on the Floor Plan view corresponding to the lower of two floors you wish to join with a stair. On the Ribbon: Architecture > Circulation > Stair (Stair by Component). Next, on the Ribbon: Modify | Create Stair > Components, choose Run, and then click in the floor plan to begin the stair.

2. To create a single-run stair: move the mouse in the direction of the stair run until Revit reads “0 remaining” risers. Click to complete the stair. Finally, click the green check mark.

3. To create a switchback (double-run) stair: move the mouse in the direction of the first run for the desired number of risers. Click to complete the run. Move the mouse to the starting point of the next run and click to start. Move the mouse in the direction of the second run until Revit reads “0 remaining” risers. Click to complete the stair. Finally, click the green check mark.

4. Create Openings in Floors. In the Project Browser, double-click on a floor plan. Window the entire model to select it. On the Ribbon: Modify | Multi-Select > Selection > Filter. Uncheck all selection categories except Floors.

5. Next, on the Ribbon: Modify | Floors > Mode > Edit Boundary. Then, on the Ribbon: Modify | Floors > Edit Boundary > Draw, choose Boundary Line. Use the Draw tools (and other tools as needed in the Modify panel) to draw the required boundaries. When complete, on the Ribbon: Modify | Floors > Edit Boundary > Mode, click the green check mark to complete the sketch.

Step-by-Step: Revit Tutorial / Basic Building Shell + Floors

This tutorial assumes that you have a basic building design sketched out and ready to model in Revit. The tutorial also assumes that you have some approximate knowledge about the site contours immediately adjacent to the building.

1. Create a New Project using the Architectural Template.

revit_03_01

2. Sketch the plan of exterior walls. On the Ribbon: Architecture > Build > Wall (or type WA). On the Properties Palette, choose a wall type. You can always change this later, so you might begin by choosing Basic Wall — Generic — 6″. On the Options Bar, for Location Line, choose Finish Face: Exterior. Make sure the Chain option is selected. Click point by point, proceeding counterclockwise around the plan, until the sketch is complete. Click esc to end the command.

3. Make any adjustments for unique walls. For example, if one wall is thicker than most, select it (using the Modify tool) and choose a different wall type from the Type Selector (at the top of the Properties Palette). If you want to create a completely unique wall type, click Edit Type in the Properties Palette. In the Type Properties dialog box, click Duplicate. Give the new wall type a name (such as Generic — 18″). Under Type Parameters, click the Edit button next to the Structure parameter. Change the Thickness to 18″. Click OK. Finally, click OK to exit the Type Properties dialog box.

4. Specify the project’s geographic location. On the Ribbon: Manage > Project Location > Location. For example, you can define the location by the Default City List and choose Fargo, ND. (Specifying the location will help to ensure cast shadows are accurately generated in renderings.)

5. In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click on Site.

6. Construct a toposurface. On the Ribbon: Massing & Site > Model Site > Toposurface. Next, on the Ribbon: Modify | Edit Surface > Tools > Place Point. Click in the modeling window to set four points in an approximate rectangle around the perimeter of the building. As you set each point, on the Options Bar, give each point a unique elevation. (We’ll edit this later.) On the Ribbon: Modify | Edit Surface > Surface, click the green check mark to complete the toposurface.

7. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the 3D View tool to switch to the default 3D view.

8. Construct a Building Pad. On the Ribbon: Massing & Site > Model Site > Building Pad. Next, on the Ribbon: Modify | Create Pad Boundary > Draw, choose the Boundary Line option, then the Pick Walls tool. In turn, click on each of the exterior walls of the building. On the Ribbon: Modify | Create Pad Boundary > Mode, click the green check mark to complete the Building Pad.

9. Edit the toposurface. In the Project Browser, under Elevations, double-click on East. Click on the toposurface. On the Ribbon: Modify | Topography > Surface, click Edit Surface. In the modeling window, move the toposurface points to approximate the slope of the site. When done editing, on the Ribbon: Modify | Edit Surface > Surface, click the green check mark.

10. Add Levels. Still in the East elevation view, add levels corresponding to various floors in your building. On the Ribbon: Architecture > Datum > Level, or type LL. Click to place levels.

11. In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click on Level 1.

12. Add two building sections. Choose the Section tool from the Quick Access Toolbar.

13. On the Quick Access Toolbar, click the 3D View tool to switch to the default 3D view.

14. Adjust wall heights. Draw a window around the model. In the Properties Palette, in the Properties Filter dropdown (which should read Common), select Walls. Under Constraints, for Top Constraint, set the height of the walls. Click Apply.

15. In the Project Browser, under Floor Plans, double-click on Level 2.

16. Add a Floor. On the Ribbon: Architecture > Build > Floor. In the Properties Palette, choose a floor type corresponding to your preference (for example: Generic — 12″). Next, on the Ribbon: Modify | Create Floor Boundary > Draw, choose Boundary Line and the Pick Walls tool. In turn, click the walls which bound your floor. Next, on the Ribbon, Modify | Create Floor Boundary > Mode, click the green check mark to complete the sketch. NOTE: If you are prompted with a warning message about overlapping geometry, click Yes to join. Or, if you see a message about closed loops, this means you need to click Continue to trim or extend lines to make a complete boundary. There are a set of tools on the Modify panel for making changes. Remember to click the green check mark to complete the sketch.

17. In the Project Browser, under Sections, double-click on either section drawing. Verify the position of the floor relative to the level.

18. Copy the floors. Invoke the Copy tool (Modify > Modify > Copy, or type CO). Next, click on the floor you wish to copy. Press Enter to complete the selection.Then, click on a start point and a destination point. Repeat until all floors are copied.

19. Add a Roof. The process for adding a roof is very similar to the process for adding a floor. Begin by creating a new Level for the roof: double-click on the East Elevation view. Choose Architecture > Datum > Level (or type LL). Once placed, double-click on the name of the new Level and rename it as Roof. When prompted to rename corresponding views, choose Yes.

20. In the Project Browser, double-click on the Roof level Floor Plan view.

21. On the Ribbon: Architecture > Build > Roof (Roof by Footprint). In the Properties palette, choose an appropriate roof type (e. g., Basic Roof — Generic 12″). Next, in the Ribbon: Modify | Create Roof Footprint, choose Boundary Line and use either the Pick Lines tool, or any of the Draw tools, to draw the footprint of the roof.* When finished, click the green check mark.

* 21a (OPTIONAL). If you want to make a flat roof, make sure that the “Defines slope” check box in the Options Bar is checked “off” before you start drawing the roof footprint. Alternatively, you can go ahead and construct a pitched roof, and then change its slope to 0/12.

22. Double-click on a building section view to check the position of the roof. Note that by default, flat roofs will appear with their bottom surface flush with the level. To adjust this: click on the roof to select it; then in the Properties palette, under Constraints, enter a negative number in the Base Offset From Level. (The negative number should be equal to the depth of the roof.) Press Enter or click Apply.

23. The basic building shell is complete.